CONTACT US

For any general inquiries, please fill in the following contact form:

Our websites never use cookies or other technologies such as pixel tags and web beacons. We only retain personal information when the contact section of our websites is filled. To proceed and get in touch with us through this format please read our Terms & Conditions, updated to be in line with the provisions of the GDPR, and tick this box to consent in us retaining the above information for contacting purposes only.

SUBMIT

Government pays Deloitte £2.6m for post-Brexit training

Government pays Deloitte £2.6m for post-Brexit training

The government is paying Deloitte £2.6m to train its staff in post-Brexit international commercial disputes

The Trade Remedies Investigations Technical Training programme will be taught to staff of the new UK Trade Remedies Authority, which aims to be operational in time for Brexit.

The programme started in June and will run until February 2019, one month before the UK leaves the EU.

Deloitte is being paid £14,000 per day to design and deliver the training, which will be split into core modules for all staff and technical modules for about 100 investigations staff.

A Deloitte spokesperson said, “Leaving the EU presents a series of challenges and opportunities, never experienced before. Firms such as ours can help add vital capacity, expertise and insight supporting Whitehall and public services as they prepare and position themselves for the post-EU environment.”

The contract follows a clash between the Big Four firm and the government in 2016, when prime minister Theresa May’s office accused Deloitte of “touting for business” through an “unsolicited” analysis of the government’s Brexit strategy.

The memo was highly critical of May's leadership on Brexit, claiming she was “drawing in decisions and details to settle matters herself”. It said the prime minister’s attitude was unsustainable and could lead to senior civil servants having to intervene.

Deloitte said at the time that it regretted the publication of the note, and apologised for the “unintended disruption it caused government".

According to a report in The Times, the firm decided to not bid for lucrative central government contracts for the following six months.

However the government has since asked Deloitte to monitor the struggling support services and construction group Interserve.

In February, in the wake of the collapse of construction company Carillion, the Cabinet office asked Deloitte to advise on public sector contracts held by Interserve.

Source: https://economia.icaew.com

MORE NEWS

UK's richest man moves to Monaco to 'save £4bn in tax'

UK's richest man moves to Monaco to 'save £4bn in tax'
Brexiter Sir Jim Ratcliffe’s company Ineos is reportedly working with PricewaterhouseCoopers to reduce bill.Britain’s richest man, ...

New Compliances for Companies Registered in Tax-Friendly Regions

New Compliances for Companies Registered in Tax-Friendly Regions
The British Virgin Islands (BVI) recently passed legislation strengthening transfer pricing rules, amid international criticism for its ...

RABOBANK FINED €1 MILLION FOR POOR MONEY LAUNDERING CHECKS

RABOBANK FINED €1 MILLION FOR POOR MONEY LAUNDERING CHECKS
Dutch central bank DNB fined Rabobank over 1 million euros for not having its customer files in order, and therefore doing inadequate checks...

Who's behind the blog

Who's behind the blog

SOCIAL MEDIA